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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  10:46:30 AM  Show Profile
Susan Davis, (sidavis, #3073) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an intermediate level Quilting badge.

"My daughter was visiting me and kept telling me how much she loves Florida. I got the idea to make a small quilt for her depicting all the fun things she does here.

I think it turned out pretty nice. My daughter loves it."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  10:57:16 AM  Show Profile
Emily Hack, (alterationsbyemily, #2951) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Aprons badge.

"I already have several aprons for myself, so I joined the Summer Apron Swap on the MaryJanesFarm Forums. I designed the half apron to be girly and cute, using some adorable fabric of women on a picnic.

I am very proud of it and hope the other girl in the swap likes it just as much as me."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:01:52 AM  Show Profile
Emily Hack, (alterationsbyemily, #2951) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an intermediate level Entrepreneurial Spirit badge.

"The cost breakdowns that I developed were a bit underestimated in time. I have now had to adjust some items to meet the curve. I also sat down and created the “official” logo.

I am very proud of my new logo and it looks great on the business cards that I will hand out. My printer was not happy about the amount of ink I used, but we will get a refill kit and move on."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:05:58 AM  Show Profile
Emily Hack, (alterationsbyemily, #2951) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an intermediate level Unprocessed Kitchen badge.

"Continuing on with this, we have pizza Tuesday in our house. I found a great recipe for quick pizza crust. I then used homemade tomato sauce and locally made cheese. The following item I made was Chicken Piccata. I worked for hours making the noodles myself and then drying my bread to pound out into bread crumbs. The eggs were from a great gal down the street.

Incredible! Both meals turned out fantastic and my family was surprised to know that I had made and saved every inch of it."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:11:36 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Goad, (Homestead Dreams, #3028) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a beginner level Farmgirl Gratitude badge.

"The requirements were to keep a gratitude journal everyday for a month. Don’t repeat the same gratitude more than once to qualify for this badge.

I am actually going on more than seven weeks with this project. It was something I began before my Farmgirl days. I discovered the idea of daily gratitude through the blog called Holy Experience by Ann Voskamp. She even offers a little printable gratitude booklet ( http://www.aholyexperience.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/7Gifts.pdf ). This project is a sort of spiritual exercise for me. I keep track of anything and everything I am grateful for that day: people I am grateful for, something someone did for me, something I appreciate, little “thank-you God” moments. If it gave me a good/positive/awe-inspiring/humbling feeling it’s fair game.

I began by using Voskamps’ booklets but found I would misplace them or forget them at home when I was out and about. Being a modern Farmgirl I always carry my cell phone with me so I got he idea of keeping an ongoing memo on my Blackberry (someone needs to come up with a App for this!). When I am in a moment of gratitude I like to be able to document it right then if I can, even snap a photo (if it’s an image I’m grateful for i.e. a beautiful sunset, a lovely mountain seen, or even as simple as tree covered in pink blossoms, etc).

Gratitude journaling has changed my life. Seriously. I was going through some really rough times in my life. I mean HUGE, that would put even the best of people in a rut. It felt like God gave me the short-end of the stick in life--it stunk, I was miserable, probably borderline depressed. Then I came across this idea, this project, of keeping track of all the little things I am given each day--to acquire an outlook of gratitude and gratefulness. It was through this journal that I realized I have so many people and things to be thankful for. That all-in-all life IS good. It’s the little things in life. But if you don’t notice these little things they can be easily overlooked.

And yes, becoming a MaryJane Farmgirl is one of the items on my gratitude list. I needed this too to get me out of my rut. My membership was courtesy of my mother, God bless her (a M.J.Farmgirl herself). My membership is a little something fun in life. It's some hope, some inspiration to have a dream again (hence the name Homestead Dreams), and a community of some like-minded farm girls I can relate to. It that’s not something to be grateful for I don’t what is!!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:17:55 AM  Show Profile
Ann Myers, (Ohioann, #3129) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a beginner level Entrepreneurial Spirit badge.

"I live near an Amish community and have several friends there. On occasion I would drive one particular family for errands. When I retired from teaching they asked me if I would be available for "taxi" trips. "Taxi" is paid driving.

I enjoyed the casual driving I had done and was interested in doing it part time during retirement. I talked to several of my aquaintances in the community and they all concured that more "taxi," drivers were needed."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:23:05 AM  Show Profile
Ann Myers, (Ohioann, #3129) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an intermediate level Entrepreneurial Spirit badge.

"When I decided to "taxi," Amish I checked into all the legal aspects. I found that I would not need a CDL "commercial driver's license," as long as I used my own personal vehicle and did not have more than 10 passengers. My vehicle has room (seatbelts) for 6 passengers besides the driver. I talked to my insurance agent and decided that I did want to carry extra insurance even with the extra cost. I talked to my tax advisor and he researched the sales tax aspect. It turned out that I would have to charge sales tax so I had to obtain a vendor's permit. I also would have to file a schedule C tax report with the regular income tax. I was able to get all of these in place plus printing of business cards with the business name "Annzvan," (which is the license plate on my vehicle), within 5 weeks of when I started the research. I decided to base the fees I charge on miles driven rather than flat rate trips. If I have serveral people going to the same place I divide the total cost by the people and they each pay their share.

Once everything was in place I started by handing out business cards at several Amish business and donating several gift certificates at a benefit auction for an Amish family's medical expenses. I started with 3 families."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:27:42 AM  Show Profile
Ann Myers, (Ohioann, #3129) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an expert level Entrepreneurial Spirit badge.

"I have been "taxi," driving for the Amish in my community for about 10 months. I continue to gain customers and have learned to adjust the per mile rate as the gas prices fluctuate.

I enjoy this work very much. I have made new friends in the community and have discovered (and support) several small home business run mostly by Amish women. I have learned that I did not take into account in my original planning the extra mileage for my vehicle making more frequent service necessary. I can be as busy as I want to and have had to learn to block out dates on my planning calendar when I need to do things for myself as I could "taxi" 7 days a week and this was supposed to be a part-time retirement job!! On the other hand I am making enough money to make the gas and car payments and a little extra. I have a lot of wait time while ladies shop, go to the doctor or visit with friends so I try to plan to have audio books to listen to and hand work to do (knitting and embroidery). I will continue to do this as long as I enjoy it !!
Note: I have not included any pictures because taking pictures of my customers would be offensive to them."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:32:15 AM  Show Profile
Sue Frelick, (Sunshine_Sue, #2133) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a beginner level Get It Together badge.

"There were food containers everywhere! In the cupboard; on a shelf in the closet; in the freezer mostly empty; fallen behind the freezer...

I spent a couple of days finding and organizing them into one drawer – matching covers to bottoms as I went. There weren’t very many tops without bottoms, but there were some. Those went to the recycler’s, and what we didn’t use has been given away.

Now, container tops are stored vertically in a re-purposed Clementine box in a drawer with stacks of containers --- and extra room for my small zip lock and sandwich bags to boot!

Supper-time clean-up is so much easier now; I prepare extra just to have left-overs!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  11:55:28 AM  Show Profile
Cassilynn Brown, (#2945) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Quilting badge.

"I've already been quilting for a while and tend to make baby quilts for friends who are expecting. Since I work in a hospital, there is usually someone I know pregnant. I am submitting my latest baby quilt for this badge. This was a simply applique quilt for a co-worker who is due the same day I am. I tried a few new techniques on this I had seen used on a pair of slippers. The flower stems are twisted scraps of fabric sewn up the middle and then coiled to fit my design. I paper pieced the flowers, which was time consuming. Overall, I think I put in about 6 hours in on this quilt.

I was extremely pleased with the final project. Paper piecing the hexagonal flowers took some time, but was overall relaxing since it allowed me to sit comfortably and "zone out" as I worked. The most gratifying part of the quilt was seeing my co-workers reaction and knowing how much she liked it."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:01:05 PM  Show Profile
Sue Frelick, (Sunshine_Sue, #2133) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Sew Wonderful badge.

"I teach young children to sew, but I am in early retirement because I had a stroke last fall. When I returned home from hospital in order to continue my recovery I tried to think of a way to keep my students, and their adult helpers, sewing together and having fun doing it.

I thought to use my sewing blog to send articles and tutorials one of which was what to put in a beginner’s sewing basket.

I put a basket together to photograph as I wrote the posts, and made 3 needle books to go with it. I did this all using only my left hand as my right side had been affected by the stroke.

The basket, and the website have turned out well as I have been contacted by mothers who visit and learn."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:06:16 PM  Show Profile
Cassilynn Brown, (#2945) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Buttoned Up badge.

"My Grandmother used to work for Universal Fasteners and during her time there, she had saved different types of buttons she helped to produce. I remember playing with these buttons when I was younger and knew I had them around my house somewhere. It took a little bit a digging through boxes to find them, but I eventually collected them all together. Some had been used over time to replace buttons on pants, and others used as templates to make buttons out of polymer clay for other projects, so there were buttons scattered everywhere. My daughter and I sorted them and made a list of the various types in the jar. Overall, there are 257 buttons.

My daughter and I had fun with this. It brought back memories of my Grandmother for me and led to some story telling since my daughter was still a baby when my Grandmother pasted. Good time spent together reminiscing."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:11:40 PM  Show Profile
Sue Frelick, (Sunshine_Sue, #2133) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Buttoned Up badge.

"Buttons are continually added to my button jar whenever a shirt or other article of clothing tires out. Some are yard sale finds, and special ones are store bought. Children who visit stay busy for ages playing with all the shapes and colors. Adults too!

Children who visit stay busy for ages playing with all the shapes and colours. Adults like to run their fingers through them too!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:42:12 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth, (Carrie M, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an intermediate level Weaving badge.

"Card weaving has been around for more than 4000 years and has not changed much during that time. Because the individual cards must be manipulated by the weaver, it is used mainly for weaving narrow bands such as belts or bracelets. Despite the fact that is is “labor intensive” it offers some of the best pattern opportunities and is still widely used. Other types of looms include “Warp Weighted” looms which were large early looms built from tree branches with the warp threads weighted at the bottom. Horizontal looms were the next to appear, allowing the loom to be built on the ground and with more flexible dimensions. Pit looms were similar to ground looms; the corners were placed on pegs in the ground, but the pit beneath allowed the weaver to sit at the edge and work instead of bending over the loom. (Go to http://www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~dvess/ids/fap/pitl.jpg
for a photo of this type of loom.) The frame loom was the first portable loom made from pieces of wood attached at the corners and the warp threads wound top-to-bottom. The backstrap loom made it easier for weavers to make longer woven pieces on a portable loom. One end of the warp threads is secured to an object while the other ends are secured to a rod which is held in place by a belt or strap wrapped around the weavers body. A heddle is used to create “shed” in the threads. The warp threads may be wound up and then unwrapped to lengthen, while the woven end may be wrapped up to bring the new warp threads closer to the weaver. These looms are still in use in the Southwest United States, Central America, and Mexico. My children say that they saw weavers using backstrap looms in Arequippa, Peru on their recent visit! The foot-treadle and computer driven looms are newer technology in the weaving industry. They are not portable, but assist the weaver with thread count, length and width, harnesses, treadles, and pattern sequence and repetitions. (http://www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~dvess/ids/fap/compl.jpg ).

My own card weaving project has been satisfying. I used mercerized cotton as recommended in “Card Weaving” by Candace Crockett, a very helpful guide with fantastic pictures and step-by-step explanations and instructions. I found the set up for this form of weaving to be more labor intensive in the beginning than the other methods, but the actual weaving went very quickly. I am quite happy with my length of strap which is the first project in Ms. Crockett's book; it used 10 cards (made from cereal boxes) with four holes each. I ran 40 lengths of cotton through the cards and made a shuttle out of cardboard to wrap my weft thread around. I like using the cards to move the warp threads and create a shed for running the weft thread through. It was easier than picking the threads one at a time and it was easier to pack the weft after each row. My strap is not very pretty at the beginning but I was able to acquire an even tension after just a few inches. I gave my children a demonstration, and tomorrow I will share my new skill with my farmgirls group!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:47:22 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth, (Carrie M, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a beginner level Stargazing Chicks badge.

"I have always been fascinated by the night sky. I have, over the course of my life, learned to pick out several constellations such as Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, the belt of Orion, and Leo the lion. Polaris, of course, is easy to locate! For the purpose of this badge I increased my knowledge of the stars by distinguishing a few more constellations and stars. First of all, I became aware of Andromeda, the only other galaxy visible with the naked eye, in the autumn sky. I have often seen this hazy patch of light but was not aware of it's name. It is one of the easier wonders of the night sky to pick out on a clear night. The constellations I have more recently become familiar with are the Crow (Corvus) which is a little tangled up with Hydra, and Virgo (the virgin) which is just slightly above Corvus and contains the very bright star, Spica. Currently, Saturn is visible among the stars of Virgo and easily spotted from my side yard where I spend evenings beside a campfire. Arcturus is also visible just above Virgo, another highly visible star which appears early in the evening.

Other bright objects, besides the moon which is currently in day nine of its 28 day phase (a little more than half-way to full moon) are Regulus, Procyon and Alphard. Polaris would be visible to me if I did not have a tree covered hill to the north of my home which blocks the northern sky. Degree of arc refers to the magnitude (brightness) of a light in the sky. Basically, the smaller the number the brighter the star. An m=16 star is brighter than an m=21 star. Bright planets have a magnitude of -1 to -4, bright stars fall into the m=1 or 2 category, while stars that appear faint to the naked eye have a magnitude of about 6 or 7. A telescope can help us to view stars that have a magnitude of 20+. Some people, like Stephen James O'Meara (featured in Timothy Ferris' “Seeing in the Dark”) have become noted for being able to “see” more than the average star gazer with minimal equipment; Stephen mapped radial “spokes” on Saturn's rings, determined Uranus' rate of rotation, and was the first to spot the return of Halley's comet in 1985. All of these discoveries were later confirmed or verified by professionals. The varying degrees of arc are most noticeable when the sky is very clear and light pollution is nil. The fainter stars will show up better and offer greater contrast to the brighter stars.

I have done some projects with my kids as part of our homeschooling study of the stars in relation to God as the creator. One thing we did was made constellations on the bedroom ceilings with little glow-in-the-dark stars. This is great fun and has helped the kids to be able to find some of the more obvious constellations in the sky. We also made “constellation makers” out of shoe boxes. This involved making a hole in each end of the shoe box; one for a flashlight to shine into the box, and the other for a “constellation slide” which we made out of thin box board. Each slide had the stars of the constellation punched through it so that when the flashlight was placed in the opposite end, a constellation would appear on the wall!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  12:52:57 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth, (Carrie M, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning an intermediate level Stargazing Chicks badge.

"I am pleased to say that I am finally able to write something other than “cloudy” in my stargazing log as of this week! We have had such a run of gloomy weather that I was afraid I may never see another star in my life! In fact, this week there has been so little haze in the sky that the stars are bright and clear with nary a twinkle. Unfortunately, the milky way is out of my vision at this point in time, but should appear again soon. I also have a disadvantage to watching stars from my quiet spot here at home as I have a large factory across the road, creating quite a bit of light pollution. My favorite home viewing comes on evenings after a big spring storm hits, leaving the skies clear and the electricity down. On nights like this I can see the entire southern sky before me. I held a little stargazing party in my quiet spot last night with my children. We had a small campfire, some marshmallows, and our sky guides. We started noticing stars at about 8:15 and more continued to appear until we were able to pick out the brighter stars in a few constellations. My daughter picked out Corvus immediately. We also found several bright stars and Saturn.

I cannot see Jupiter at this season as it is currently among the stars of Pisces which are too low in the northern sky for me to view. I should be able to see it again in a few months when it is in the southern sky among the stars of the Ram. I did some research on the planet and discovered that Galileo's mapping of the moons of Jupiter helped “dismantle” the earlier geocentric theory (the belief that Earth, not the sun, was the center of our universe). Galileo mapped four moons (which appear as shadows when viewing the planet) but 59 more moons have been discovered since. Callisto, the 2nd largest moon orbiting Jupiter, is similar to our moon and is heavily cratered from being hit with objects from space.

I am enjoying Timothy Ferris' book “Seeing in the Dark,” especially the short biographical stories."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  1:05:43 PM  Show Profile
Amber Noah, (AmberNWichita, #2992) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level Bee Good to Your Mother Earth badge.

"A couple of years ago my family had decided that we had enough of eating expensive processed foods. So we set out an adventure to turn our back yard into a food forest. This year is the first time we put some real effort into. My husband and another gardening friend with the same goals built our boxes out of old pallets. Over the winter I filled them with neighborhood leaves and grass clippings, dirt, chicken manure, rabbit manure and compost. When "spring" came here I filled the boxes with broccoli, peas, collards, cabbage and kale. I covered them with hay and topped the boxes with old storm windows. When it snowed again in April my seedlings were tucked safe and warm under the glass windows.

Here in June, the peas have bloomed, and collards and kale are savory and the Brussels sprouts are starting to grow heads. My 2 year old foraged for an afternoon snack in the strawberries."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  1:18:50 PM  Show Profile
Emily Hack, (alterationsbyemily, #2951) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an intermediate level Buttoned Up badge.

"I purchased some adorable vintage sewing supplies at my local flea market this past weekend. Inside there were some super large hooks and eyes and adorable wood buttons. I strung them on some bright pink embroidery floss and knotted the hook and eye on either end.

I love this little bracelet, it’s sweet to wear and super light so I forget that I am wearing it."


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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  1:31:31 PM  Show Profile
Amber Noah, (AmberNWichita, #2992) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level Backyard Farmer badge.

"March 2010 on a whim, after a dozen Mother Earth News magazines, books, and lots and lots of googling I decided to go "look" at the baby chicks at the tractor store. Instantly I was hooked on them and left the store with brooding lights, metal feeders, feed, bedding and 4 baby chickens. even though I wasn't a seasoned chicken person and I had no idea what kind of chickens I had in the box I was the proud new parent of 4 peeping little girls.

It's been a year and I love my girls. They brighten up my morning, help out with breakfast, and cleared up my ant problem. Since the girls have gotten older I have added 5 more to my flock. I think I will always have chickens the rest of my life."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  2:05:29 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth, (Carrie M, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an expert level Weaving badge.

"I have done a number of projects to earn the final level of the weaving badge. I made and used a backstrap loom!! Mine had a “rigid” heddle, meaning that it was a stiff piece (cut from a cereal box) that had dots and slots cut in it for the warp threads to run through. (I learned this technique on a youtube video but lost the web address and sadly cannot share it.) This made a nice shed for the weft yarn to pass through. I made several bookmarks with different yarns including wool and acrylic. I also learned how to make heddles out of different materials such as Popsicle sticks or with a long stick and loops of string. I was able to view a large loom with foot pedals in action at the Adirondack Folk School.

I also experimented with some basket weaving techniques, and I made a large outdoor loom near my garden which will be woven with wild things like grape vines and flower stems. This is my outdoor weaving party which will last all summer and include my family and any quests we have who will be invited to add to the tapestry. I have found some seeds for “Cardinal Climber” flowers which will eventually grow up the loom and weave themselves into my project. It will be my “piece de resistance”!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  2:14:17 PM  Show Profile
Scarlett Winters, (silver3wings, #2044) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning an intermediate level Let's Get Physical badge.

"The majority of the food I eat is organic. I even joined the CSA of a local certified organic farm in town. My doctor has me on a special diet. So, I have to be careful to eat the right things at the right time. I have also continued to track my exercise.

I fell off the exercise tracking wagon for a couple of weeks due to my mother being in the hospital, but even then, I made a point to keep up with my walking even when I couldn’t do my weight training."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  3:37:04 PM  Show Profile
Scarlett Winters, (silver3wings, #2044) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a beginner level Plant It Forward badge.

"This spring, I planted six Earthboxes with vegetables. I donated the vegetables from one of them to the local food pantry.

It felt great to know the fresh veggies from my garden would be dressing up the dinner tables of those who need healthy, organic food the most."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2011 :  3:54:48 PM  Show Profile
Scarlett Winters, (silver3wings, #2044) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level Gaining Ground badge.

"Worms Eat My Garbage," by Mary Appelhof is excellent. It’s a small book and easy read. It describes how easy it is for anyone, even apartment dwellers to have a worm bin. As inspiring as it was, I don’t think I’m ready for a worm bin yet. I live in a condo. So, I’m not allowed to have an open compost heap. I purchased an Earth Machine instead. It’s a space saving compost bin that you bolt to the ground.

The best part: Worms are eating my garbage anyway because I found great big ones living in my compost bin."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 08 2011 :  10:49:18 AM  Show Profile
Tanya Murphy, (Turtlemoon, #1737) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level 3 R's Rule (Reuse, Recycle, Revive!) badge.

"Picked up some small butter knives from the goodwill and used my metal stamps to hammer in the names of plants to mark pots and rows in garden.(cost 20 cents each) My neighbor showed me how to sharpen a couple of my garden tools. Much easier now! I have gotten in the habit of keeping the tools cleaned and oiled. Keeps them in better working order and organized.

Love how the markers look! I had kept looking at these butter knives at the goodwill for weeks! They look great in the pots!

My husband is happy that I am caring better for the tools, and that I do not need him to sharpen them for me now."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Jun 08 2011 :  11:03:54 AM  Show Profile
Tanya Murphy, (Turtlemoon, #1737) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level What's your Beef? badge.

"I read through the website eatwild.com. (great site) I have also read many books and re-watched the move FoodInc. Each year we get a cow with two other couples. The cow resides at one home and is spoiled rotten with great fresh food and treats of carrots/apples/etc. This cow is later slaughtered after having had a good life and split between us. This is how we, for the most part, have organic cow. We do not call it organic beef, lol, it has always been referred to as cow in our home.

This finally converted hubby to organic meat! He also felt more so after having seen FoodInc now twice. I grew up on an organic dairy farm so.... this was all i knew. Personally I am unable to digest any meat (aside from fish/seafood)so cannot eat it. On occasion, when camping, hubby might make me a small organic cow burger. The difference in how i process this is night and day! Speaking about hours vs days of discomfort."
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