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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:32:01 PM  Show Profile
Bobbie Williams (#6321) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Green Energy Merit Badge!

“I live in Eastern Washington where all of our electricity is generated by hydro-electric power. This is non-polluting and reasonably nature friendly. The only environmentally negative, I feel, is the damming of the rivers. That being said, it has also nearly eradicated severe flooding, creates electricity and waters the arid SE corner of our state with the Columbia River Basin plans. We live in a water rich part of the country and even though it is plentiful, we need to conserve our natural resources.

Clean energy. It seems to be the most cost effective, non-polluting power production. Granted we have wind here and many wind turbine farms, there are still economic issues as well as some environmental problems to iron out.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:37:17 PM  Show Profile
Bobbie Williams (#6321) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“Beginning in 2015 we have turned in the dumpster that we have used for about 10 years and have decided to limit our garbage to 2/50 gallon cans per month which we will then haul to the recycling waste to energy plant. The dumpster was costing us $35 per month plus rent on the dumpsters and we just pretty much threw everything in it without reducing or recycling.

We have a trash compactor and will compact dry unrecyclable items and sort the rest. They actually sort the garbage at the waste to energy plant, but we will help out the workers by grouping in separate bags. We flatten cardboard boxes to reduce size and make it easier to transport.

It is working quite well. We are 3 weeks into the first month and have only filled one of the 50 gallon cans. I would say that this is a huge improvement.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:38:45 PM  Show Profile
Bobbie Williams (#6321) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“All aluminum cans are separated as are the milk cartons. Cardboard is flattened and glass is sorted by color. I compost my kitchen vegetable waste. Meat and products with fat are not recycled.
I recycle large, heavy plastic containers for mouse proof storage of dry foods (beans, pasta, etc) and do this with glass jars as well. I prefer storing food in glass over plastic.

I have been practicing this since I retired in 2012. It just becomes a way of life.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:44:24 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Home Insulation Merit Badge!

“Determining the insulation in our home is fairly easy. We have no insulation in our home, with the exception of 3 rooms we have insulated. Our older home has the old plaster and lathes walls. The walls we have insulated have R-13 insulation. We do have loose insulation in the attic. The insulation we have is Energy Star qualified. Our power company offers a $250 rebate if a min. of 400 ft of insulation is installed in walls that have no insulation installed.

Our windows are a double hung /double pane window with Low-E 366 w/argon panes. These are also Star Energy qualified and our power company offers a $25 rebate with each window we have installed. I have shared this info with my neighbor who was unaware that he could receive the rebates for his new windows if he installed them himself.

I was unaware of the rebate of the insulation and will plan a bigger redo in the future to obtain the rebate.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:48:00 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Horse Dreams Merit Badge!

“I have always loved horses. I was raised on a farm and as a child our family was very interested in horses. We all were involved in a saddle club and showed horses. Our family had a horse (Princess) that would come up to the barnyard fence and at 3 and 4 yrs old my sis and I would crawl over the fence onto her back. She would pace around and around the fence with us on her, until we grew tired. We lived in a very small farming community. I was about 13 years old when I went to our local bank and ask the banker for a loan to buy a horse. I paid $375 for a Tennessee Walker and a saddle.

Little banks back in the day did not require corporate decisions to grant loans, though I am sure the banker had an OK from my parents. He gave me the loan and I paid it back, $50 a month with babysitting money. I had "Fireball" until he had to be buried. I was married with children at this point. My favorite breed is a Tennessee Walker. They have such a beautiful gait. They are a smooth ride, a Cadillac of the horses. My family is still very much involved in horses and typically have quarter horses. I get to "meet" up close and personal often.

I venture to the All American Quarter Horse Congress each fall here in Columbus. Horses are in my blood. I love the smell of a horse. The photo I have attached is one of my dad and his horse "Buck". I love this photo of my 75 year old father.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  4:56:10 PM  Show Profile
Marilyn Hartman Sullivan (#6318) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Farmgirl Jubilee Merit Badge!

“I researched the word JUBILEE and gave it a good think. Also read about the Queen's Jubilee in 2012 and how the people of Great Britain celebrated. Thought back to my parents' 50th anniversary celebration, etc.

It is always interesting to begin a research project with only one word as the subject of that research.
JUBILEE
The very word conjures up so many images and emotions – flags, bunting, fireworks, happiness – even the jubilation that comes from the same root. Explosive like fireworks! Flags waving against a brilliantly blue sky! Happiness beyond a mere smile!
But the word jubilee has deeper and more specific meanings as well. One definition is that a jubilee is a celebration of 25 or 50 or even 60 years of a reign or activity. A golden wedding anniversary could be called a jubilee – 50 golden years of wedded bliss! Planning and attending my parents’ 50-year anniversary party was one of the high points of my siblings’ and my life. Certainly the 60-year-reign of Queen Elizabeth II was deserving of its Jubilee in 2012. A much-beloved Queen of England who has served her subjects well should be celebrated, and she WAS, in regal style. Whole villages decked themselves in Her colors, staged parades, commemorative luncheons, picnics, and pageants. One little fellow, confined to a hospital bed with a broken leg, hung streamers and banners around his room so he wouldn’t miss out on the fun. THAT’s a jubilee!!!

The word jubilee has other – not so common – meanings, as well. For instance, in the Jewish calendar, the Jubilee Year is the year at the end of 7 cycles of shmita, or Sabbatical years. According to the Biblical regulations, this had a special impact on the ownership and management of land in Israel.

Jubilee is also the name of a showgirl revue at Bally’s in Las Vegas – the last real showgirl performance left!

As I think about these definitions, I am struck that they all apply to us Farmgirls in some way or another.

We try to celebrate each day with a happy spirit and enjoyment of all the wonderful things this world brings us. Keeping a jubilant heart and spirit is at the very core of so many of our daily projects and endeavors, whether that means caring for our families, our pets, or the others around us.

We mark the passing of time with birthday parties, anniversary celebrations, and family get-togethers – certainly these can be jubilant times!

Stewardship of the land we live on (and in) is another area in which the Farmgirls shine, striking an ancient resonance with the Biblical Land of Israel and the Jubilee Year.

Finally, we may not all be Las Vegas showgirls, but each and every one of us is beautiful in so many ways – physically, spiritually, emotionally – and wouldn’t we all really rather NOT have to wear those huge feathered headpieces?

So let’s all get ready to celebrate a Farmgirl Jubilee in the coming weeks. Fly your Farmgirl flag and let your Farmgirl spirit shine.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  5:13:18 PM  Show Profile
Andrea Houck (teehee80, #6259) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Shopping Green Merit Badge!

“I collected six reusable grocery bags & committed to using them every time I grocery shop.

Great! The bags work great & I don't have to figure out how to store or recycle grocery bags from the store. I even bought a cold sack that keeps my cold foods cold on the drive home.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Mar 31 2015 :  5:29:38 PM  Show Profile
Andrea Houck (teehee80, #6259) has received a certificate of achievement in Make it Easy for earning a Beginner Level Make it Pretty Merit Badge!

“I did a collage to decorate the front & back of my notebook that I use to organize my Farmgirl Sisterhood stuff; calander, notes, phone numbers, etc.. I used paper that had designs that remind me of home kitchens & gardening. It looks great! I was very happy with how it turned out!!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  3:36:04 PM  Show Profile
Winnie Nielsen (Red Tractor Girl, #3109) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge!

“1. Since I am the one who drafted the requirements for the Jubilee badge, I had already done some research for all of the main topics. In order to do the badge, I created a few other requirements to do. First of all, a Jubilee can be a 50th year celebration and a season of celebration. In my life I remember celebration both my Grandparents and my Parent's 50th wedding anniversaries. They were wonderful celebrations with family and full of old stories, laughter, and happiness.

2.The Queen of England's Jubilee marking her 60th year of reign was national celebration for England. The BBC reported that three thousand miles of Union Jack bunting had been produced and cities across the nation were dressing their streets up for the occasion. On the event, there were parades of the Queen, radio and TV broadcasts, and people everywhere waving the Union Jack and celebrating. Who doesn't just love a good reason to be joyful and have a party! Although there are those who feel the monarchy is out dated, many still love the Queen and properly joined in all of the festivities in their own towns. Of course there were many trinkets, mugs, and other memorabilia sold for a bit of remembrance of the grand event. Small towns also held their own local celebrations for everyone to join in. The Jubilee was indeed enjoyed by many!

3. MaryJane wrote about a book, The Jubilee Trail, by Gwen Bristol on her daily blog. Because of the title, I immediately wanted to read it and include it in my badge requirements. Come to find out in the first part that The Jubilee Trail was the way people got to the West Coast and Los Angeles from Independence Missouri. The story is set in 1844 when the United States ended with Missouri. A young bride, from New York City, falls in love and marries a young man who is an tradesman of goods from the East Coast to the West. In order to get the goods there, large wagon trains had to cross Mexican land that was rugged and hostile. There were unfriendly Native Americans, long stretches of no water, brutal sun, and rocky and difficult trails.

Garnet, leaves the comfort of her life for the thrill of the unknown and the thought of adventure. On her journey to Los Angeles, she is befriended by a New York show girl, and a few of the wagon trail men. The trip was dangerous and she almost lost her life.

Upon arriving out West, she was confronted with her husband's brother who was furious at their marriage. Events happened that resulted in Garnet's husbands life and she being saved and helped with two of the men from the wagon trail.

She ends up falling in love with one of those men and eventually marries him. They leave Los Angeles with her baby son for San Francisco where gold has been found just laying around on the ground and in the rocks.

The story of a Jubilee Trail did not mean a celebration of 50 years of something. It represented a celebration of survival to a land where all new beginnings could happen. Nobody knew you and you could start over. Surviving the journey was like a badge of honor and it signified fortitude and try grit.

Reading this book reminded me of our MJF Jubilee celebration. The many Farmgirls who join have found a "new path" to journey on. With much to learn, risks to take, each one of us have reached out to something new and unknown. First Farms have been purchased, first gardens grown, first off the grid experiences have been chosen, and many new skills have been acquired while enriching our family life and communities. A Jubilee celebration can also be about meeting person goals and challenges!

4. I decided to celebrate our Jubilee on the MJF Chatroom with two give aways using skills I learned while doing some badges. The first giveaway is an embroidered dishtowel with Farmgirl at Heart logo. This is the same pattern that I have been making for all of the FGOTM sisters. Each month, I send them a handwritten note, the dishtowel with their Farmgirl number on it and a few postcards from MaryJane's store. Being chosen by your friends as FGOTM is a beautiful and happy event. As FSOTY, I wanted to gift each person something that I learned by also being a fellow Farmgirl traveler.

The second giveaway is a pair of knitted socks using a few of the colors of the logo. This giveaway will also include a handwritten note and postcards. I hope the winner enjoys wearing them!! Since they are a blend of Merion and cashmere wools, they will be soft and warm anytime it is cold and damp!

I think working on this badge was great fun. I thoroughly enjoyed reading Jubilee Trail and working on my two giveaways. Now, I am looking forward to our celebration in May!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:15:15 PM  Show Profile
Jackie Beauchene (miles2go, #6270) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Herbs Merit Badge!

“I have identified more than 5 herbs on our property and have used them as well. such herbs as self heal, dandelion, violet, wild mint, horsetail, curly dock, and nettle, maple tree.

I cooked the nettles in a meal and they tasted yummy. I have also made a tea with them and found them to be most useful for aches and pains. I have made violet syrup and dandelion jelly. I also have made a gargle with the horsetail for sore throats. I have extracted sap from the maple trees and boiled it down to make maple syrup.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:22:14 PM  Show Profile
Rebecca Hunter (modernpioneermama76, #4998) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Icing on the Cake Merit Badge!

“I took Wilton method classes with my mother as a little girl, over 30 years ago now. By the time I was eleven, I was baking and decorating most of the family birthday cakes. Learned all about borders, piping, basket weave, roses and drop flowers and character cakes using the star tips. I don't have pictures of it, but one of the more memorable cakes I made as a youngster, was a Chester Cheetah (from the Cheetos commercials) cake for my stepfather using the Pink Panther Wilton pan. We still have that pan and the kids say "it is seriously "old school" Mom!" I really enjoy cake decorating and have been starting to teach my 9 year old son Wilton method.

First of all, they usually turn out delicious... because it's cake and who doesn't love cake? Normally they turn out pretty well, though I have had a couple flops n the a actual baking on a couple gluten free/dairy free cake recipes I've tried for my 11 year-old son's birthdays... though the decorations still turned out fine. Last summer I made my husband a 3-layer purple velvet cake with blueberry filling, ivory icing with borders, decorations and Happy Birthday piped in royal purple icing.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:26:22 PM  Show Profile
Rebecca Hunter (modernpioneermama76, #4998) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Backyard Farmer Merit Badge!

“I started raising chickens for a laying flock in 2001. My first flock was mainly Barred Rocks and Rhode island reds. Feed store where we bought them only had straight run chicks at the time and I think we ended up with only about 5 hens out of 25 chicks. We had a local small business near where we lived at the time (Gooding, ID) process all but 2 of the roosters. We ate a lot of chicken and dumplings and chicken enchiladas that year. Lesson learned: if you want hens, order pullets... don't order buy "straight run" from a feed store unless it's a rare breed chicken, duck etc and is not available sorted by gender. My first flock was mainly free range sin e the dog we had then adopted the chicks and thought she was mother to them and we have always feed unmediated poultry feed. At the time commercial organic feed was difficult to find. We've had chickens in all four states have lived in (ID, TX,KS, and SD) since we married almost 13 years ago. Now our kids are starting their own small flocks for 4-H projects.

I have always had pretty good luck with my birds, until the last 3 years or so when our male goose died and we've had trouble with mink, opossum, raccoons and rats getting into our coop and killing chickens and ducks. We just got some new chicks Wednesday to put in the predator proof brooder my hubby and son's built me last spring and they have an upcoming project to predator proof the coop as soon as the tax refund arrives. And yes we will be ordering some goslings along with my son's 4-H ducklings this year. Planning on having enough eggs this fall to supply not only my household, but also my parents and their neighbor (a low income single mom with 3 daughters who attend church with my folks) in town.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:32:18 PM  Show Profile
Rebecca Hunter (modernpioneermama76, #4998) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Cheese Making Merit Badge!

“Started making goat milk, butter, yogurts, kefir, buttermilk and soft cheeses for my oldest son who was allergic to casein protein back in 2004 when he was almost a year-old, now he's 11 (almost 12) and is gluten free/dairy free due to autism. I deeply enjoy cheesemaking and have tried making lots of varieties. I have even learned to make non-dairy yogurt, buttermilk and sour cream from coconut and almond milk in the last couple of years.

Culturing milk products is such an ancient process and the science involved in this art form is fascinating. I have only had a couple that didn't turn out, usually because one of my goats was late getting her milk in and the little dab of colostrum in the milk ruined the whole batch due to colostrum's anti-bacterial properties.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:39:37 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Intermediate Level Water Conservation Merit Badge!

“Grey water is any household waste water with the exception of waste water from toilets, which is known as black water. Typically, 50-80% of household waste water is grey water from kitchen sinks, dishwashers, bathroom sinks, tubs and showers.

Grey water recycling reclaims nutrients that would otherwise be lost and returns them to the soil. We have been to the Museum and Science and Industry in Chicago where they have a "Green" house exhibit. It has a collected system to recycle all the grey water and is amazing. One of these days when it may be affordable I want one. For now, as a household we have a bucket that sits in the shower to collect water needed to adjust the shower. We have a handheld shower head that makes it easy to collect the clean water. I use it for cleaning, bathing and other things that require a clean water. We also have a bucket to gather bath water, and dish water to water the plants. I also water my house plants with leftover coffee.

We actually have built 2 rainwater barrels to collect rainwater. We use the water for watering the garden, bathing the dogs, and washing the truck.

For the next badge level I will need to cut back on laundry or something to use less water and save 10% as I feel like we do all we can...lol. I suppose I will set a timer for showers.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:42:03 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“Recycling in our area is easy to do. We can have curb pick-up for an extra $8 a month or we can just take it to a big bin at our township building and drop it off. We can recycle almost anything that does not have waste on it such as feces or food. Building materials have to be taken to a facility that handles such items.

This has been working for us for years. We choose to drop our items off in an effort to save $$”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:44:15 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“I built a big wooden bin that houses 4-32 gallon blue recycle cans to sort our recycled items. (we have surpassed the week and have been doing this for years). We are down to less than 1 bag of trash for the landfill a week.

Once you get into the habit of recycling it is hard NOT to recycle. Even and family get-togethers I am the crazy person that runs around sorting trash.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:47:02 PM  Show Profile
Patty Byrd (thebyrdhaus, #1840) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Expert Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“I recycle everything I can get my hands on! I make swiffer reusable covers from old sweatshirts. I make quilts from thrift store sheets, Shopping bags from feed bags, I recycle many things into useful items. I have influenced several family members to set up recycle stations at their homes and they collect items to give to me to recycle.

Again I am the crazy lady that always separates my trash.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  4:51:46 PM  Show Profile
Dawn Perry (#2493) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Cheesemaking Merit Badge!

“We got 4 wonderful gallons of fresh milk from our friend's farm. After letting it set our grandkids got churn and make butter in an antique Daisy churn, then mold it for Christmas dinner. more milk became yogurt, and after 8 hours and adding fresh fruit we had a wonderful treat. The next morning after tasting the tangy liquid, became wonderful buttermilk pancakes.

Wonderful!! The grandkids loved making and eating our dairy "treats". I have made it several times since... now on to cheeses.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 08 2015 :  5:02:02 PM  Show Profile
Rasa Higens (#6088) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Horse Dreams Merit Badge!

“I started talking to a lady who boards her horse, Chance, next to where I live. She had a Mustang. I got to know my other neighbor who also had a wild Mustang named Manny. Then I began lessons through a friend and took horse lessons for 4 months. I learned about the temperament of a Thoroughbred, a quarter horse and a Mustang. Then I bought a new horse named Dash To Huston who was too disobedient for my training. So, I sold Dash and found a wonderful horse named Sweet As Honey. I have been riding her for lessons and sharing her with my daughter. I also have been horse sitting for my trainer for ten days. I am in charge of 4 horses. I enjoy the easy temper and willingness of a Quarter horse.

I am enjoying ever minute. I ride 4 times a week and plan on taking more lessons and will probably get one more horse.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  3:43:28 PM  Show Profile
Theresa Atkinson (atkinst2, #1632) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Fishing Merit Badge!

“I went to: www.fishing-nc.com/fishing-knots.php and learned how to tie each knot. The Clinch knot looks like the Berkley knot which I believe is one and the same.

Fishing knots:

The challenges fishing knots, of keeping line connected to a hook and joining two lines, are as old as fishing itself. Any fishing knot will create weakness in a line, but a correctly tied fishing knot will maintain far more line strength. The fishing knots below are each designed for a particular use and matching the knot to your needs and its application is just as important as trying it correctly. Learning a new know takes patience and practice. Some knots may seem as challenging as applying for a home mortage but with a simple cheat sheet you can tie fishing knots like a master. We highly recommend printing a few of these out and adding them to your tackle box - it's never as easy to remember that new knot technique when you are on the boat or in the surf fishing.


Turle Knot
1. Thread fly onto tippet and leave several inches of tag end to form the knot. Double the line back onto itself toward the fly and then bring the tag end behind then over the doubled line, making a loop. Pass tag end twice through the loop created, essentially tying a double overhand knot.

2. Tighten down the knot just created and slip the loop over the fly. Pull on the leader to set the knot tight against the hook eye.

3. Trim the tag end.


One thing to note, if you aren't using the Palomar fishing knot below, you need to start. The International Game Fish Association regards it as the strongest knot known for securing line to hooks, swivels, and artificial lures. It's very simple and will maintain more line strength than other fishing knots. We almost exclusively use Palomar knots when attaching any lure to fishing line, mono or fluorocarbon leaders, and even braid. One tip to improve the Palomar knot - wet the knot with some water or saliva before cinching it tight, this will improve knot strength.
________________________________________
Palomar Knot
Our overall favorite fishing knot for line and braid
The Palomar Knot is a general-purpose connection used in joining fishing line to swivels, snaps, hooks and artificial lures. The double wrap of through the eyelet provides a protective cushion for added knot strength. One of the strongest fishing knots, be sure to wet the line before cinching it tight.

1. Double the line and form a loop three to four inches long. Pass the end of the loop through hook's eye.
2. Hold standing line between thumb and finger, grasp loop with free hand and form a simple overhand knot.
3. Pass hook through loop and draw line while guiding loop over top of eyelet.
4. Pull tag end of line to tighten the knot snugly and trim the tag end to about 1/4 inch.
________________________________________
Albright Knot
The best fishing knot to connect line to leader when casting
The Albright Knot is most commonly used for joining monofilament or braided lines of unequal diameters, and for creating shock leaders. It is also used for connecting monofilament to wire.

1. Bend a loop in the tag end of the heavier line and hold between thumb and forefinger of left hand. Insert the tag end of the lighter line through loop from the top.
2. Slip tag end of lighter line under your left thumb and pinch it tightly against the heavier strands of the loop. Wrap the first turn of the lighter line over itself and continue wrapping toward the round end of loop. Take at least 12 turns with the lighter line around all three strands.
3. Insert tag end of the lighter line through end of loop from the bottom. It must enter and leave the loop on same side.
4. With the thumb and forefinger of left hand, slide the coils of lighter line towards end of loop, stop 1/8" from end of loop. Using pliers, pull tag end of lighter line tight to keep coils from slipping off loop.
5. With your left hand still holding the heavier line pull on the standing part of the lighter line. Pull the tag end of the lighter line and the standing part a second time. Pull the standing part of the heavy mono and the standing part of the light line.
6. Trim both tag ends.
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Wedge Knot
An easier knot for leaders
The Wedge Knot is a general-purpose, easy to tie connection used in joining fishing line to a leader with a loop.

1. Tie a knot in the end of fishing line.
2. Pass the fishing line and knot through the leader loop and back around to form a simple knot.
3. Pull both ends to cinch up tight.
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Trilene® Knot
The fishing knot we use when a Palomar knot won't work
The Trilene Knot is a strong, reliable connection that resists slippage and premature failures. This fishing knot can be used in joining line to swivels, snaps, hooks and artificial lures. The knots' unique double wrap design and ease of tying consistently yields a strong, dependable connection.

1. Run end of line through eye of hook or lure and double back through the eye a second time.
2. Loop around standing part of line 5 or 6 times. Thread tag end back between the eye and the coils as shown.
3. Tighten knot with a steady, even motion without hesitation. Trim tag end leaving about 1/4 inch.
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Berkley® Braid Knot
This special fishing knot has been extensively tested by the Berkley R&D staff and has proven to be one of the best for use with the new braided lines.

1. Run a double loop through the eye of hook or lure.
2. Loop around the end of line and standing part of braided line 8 times. Thread double loop back between the eye and coils.
3. Tighten knot with a steady, even motion without hesitation. Trim double loop and end of braided line leaving about 1/4 inch.
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Arbor Knot
The Arbor Knot provides the angler with a quick, easy connection for attaching line and is excellent for trying fishing line to the reel spool.

1. Pass the line around the reel arbor.
2. Tie an overhand knot around the standing line. Then tie a second overhand knot in the tag end.
3. Pull the line tight and snip off excess. Snug down the first overhand knot on the reel arbor.
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Kingsling Knot
The King Sling Knot offers the angler an easy-to-tie end loop knot which is used primarily as a connection for crank baits and other artificial lures. This fishing knot allows the lure to work freely, making it more lifelike, and resulting in more strikes.

1. Insert the tag end of the line through the artificial bait so that it extends eight to ten inches.
2. Hold the tag end and the standing line in your left hand, and form a loop.
3. With the bait in your right hand make four turns around the tag end and the standing line above the loop.
4. Bring the bait down and through the loop.
5. To tighten, hold the line above the loop length and pull the tag end and the standing line at the same time. Trim the tag end.
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Nail Knot
The Nail Knot is generally used to attach fly line to fly line backing but this knot can also be used to attach leader to fishing line. The nail knot makes a strong smooth knot that rolls out when casting and is good for attaching two lines of different diameters.

1. Hold nail or needle, tip of fly line and backing material between thumb and forefinger. Wrap backing 6 or 7 turns. Wind carefully for a tight, smooth knot. Stick end of backing between nail and fly line.
2. Remove nail. Holding coils carefully between thumb and forefinger, alternately pull both end of backing with free hand to tighten.
3. Snip off excess backing and end of fly line.
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Snell Knot
The Snell Knot provides a strong connection when fishing with bait and using a separate length of leader. You can only use a snell knot with a leader.

1. Insert one end of the leader through the hook's eye extending one to two inches past the eye. Insert the other end of the leader through the eye in the opposite direction point towards the barb of hook. Hold the hook and leader ends between thumb and forefinger of your left hand. Leader will hang below the hook in a large loop.
2. Take the part of this loop that is closest to the eye and wrap it over the hook and shank and both ends of the leader toward the hook's barb. Wrap for 7 or 8 turns and hold wraps with left hand. Grip the end of leader that is through the eyelet with your right hand and pull it slowly and steadily. Hold the turns with your left hand or the knot will unravel.
3. When the knot is almost tight, slide it u against the eye of the hook. Grip the short end lying along the shank of the hook with a pair of pliers. Pull this end and the standing line at the same time to completely tighten the knot. Trim the tag end.
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Specialist Fly Knot
The Specialist Fly Knot is used to attach the fly to the leader.

1. Place the leader through the fly eyelet and slide the fly up the leader out of the way before beginning knot.
2. Make an oval loop and hold each end while wrapping the leader around the loop center 3 or 4 times.
3. Stick end of leader through loop closest to fly and cinch knot snug.
4. Trim tag end then place the fly though the loop and pull the knot snug.
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Double Surgeon's Loop Knot
The Double Surgeon's Loop is a quick, easy way to tie a loop in the end of a leader. This fishing knot is often used as part of a leader system because it is relatively strong.

1. Double the tag end of the line. Make a single overhand knot in the double line.
2. Hold the tag end and standing part of the line in your left hand and bring the loop around and insert through the overhand knot.
3. Hold loop in your right hand. Hold the tag end and standing line in your left hand.
4. Moisten the knot in water and pull to tighten. Trim tag end to about 1/8 inch.

I really enjoyed working with the knots for this badge.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  3:49:20 PM  Show Profile
Marilyn Hartman Sullivan (#6318) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Speak for the Trees Merit Badge!

“I obtained a guide covering trees native to our area and took a little walk outside!

SPEAK FOR THE TREES
Beginner Level
I purchased a tree identification guide used through Amazon and it has been a wonderful addition to our shelf of reference books at home. It is specifically Trees of Pennsylvania, so there’s no wading through pages and pages of trees we don’t have. (I mean, who wants to look at pictures of lemon trees in bloom when there’s a couple of feet of snow on the ground?)

I myself am a transplant to Southeast Pennsylvania from Western Washington, so I have been enjoying the oaks and hardwoods so much. My sweetie (His Dudeness) is a lifelong resident of Chester County, so he is always willing to point out the species with which I am not familiar and to take me to parks and forest walks to enjoy the outdoors.
Our place is on a wooded acre, so getting outside to get up-close-and-personal with some of our trees was a fun project!

The Grandfather Oak in our front yard turns out to be a pin oak. There are so many types of oak trees here, but the pin oak can be identified quite easily by the leaf, which has much pointier lobes than the other oaks. The pin oak is native to the southern half of the state and produces a fruit (acorn) that is eaten by many animals. I know the deer tracks are generally pretty thick on the ground out there! One interesting thing about our particular Grandfather Oak is that there is one low branch that never loses its leaves in the fall – they turn russet brown and then hang on all winter, to be pushed off when the green leaves come in spring. Even during the windiest storms, those old leaves just hang there.
Another tree native to our area is the Eastern Redbud. This particular specimen was planted here by our neighbor, who got several young trees from a conservation project. It is simply gorgeous in the springtime, when it puts on its show of purple/pink blossoms.

What a show! My first experience with the Eastern Redbud was through the window of the train as I rode from Seattle to Wilmington, Delaware to visit my daughter before I moved here. Scattered throughout the early spring green of the awakening forests would be these bright waves of delicious purply-pink! I couldn’t find anyone on the train who knew what these lovely trees were, and it wasn’t until I moved out here to our little woods that I found out. Last spring (Mother’s Day weekend, actually), my cousins were visiting from Indiana and we were sitting out on the deck having a little drink before dinner. My sweet Hoosier cousin was wearing a sweater in a brilliant shade of fuchsia and we all noticed that the redbud in the background was a perfect match for her.

The third tree in my little project is another wild tree – the American Plum. This tree grows easily in many areas, but is not tolerant of shade, so you see it mostly at the edges of forests and in more open habitat. It produces an edible fruit that is much prized by hikers and outdoors enthusiasts. When I was looking at this tree, I found several videos on You Tube about how to identify it and how to use the fruit. In one of the videos, the speaker was going on blithely about the American Plum and how to tell when the fruit is ripe, etc., when he walked full-on into a big spider web! I am so glad he left the dancing in the video!!! We’ve all done it, admit it! This tree does not live as long as the oaks, maybe only about 30 years tops, but it is such a wonderful harbinger of spring that we forgive it.

Lots and lots of other trees on our little home place—dogwoods and hollies and many species of nuts. I think I would like to keep a little notebook with leafing times for some of my favorites.
Thank you so much for offering this merit badge – it has really set me in the right direction!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  3:53:21 PM  Show Profile
Sara Knight (YellowRose, #6034) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Aprons Merit Badge!

“I choose the clothespin apron pattern that was posted on FarmGirl Connection for the Jubilee. I used two fabrics from MaryJane's Milk Cow collection.

I hadn't sewed on a machine for thirty years but it all came back to me. The pattern was easy. I am pleased with how the apron turned out.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  3:56:57 PM  Show Profile
Miranda Strickland (Missus Miranda, #3535) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Bread Making Merit Badge!

“I read up on the difference between Baking Soda and Baking Powder. I knew a few things already, but what I learned REALLY gave me a better idea of how they work and why, sometimes, my quickbreads don't turn out so good.

Over the weekend I made a Panniers Loaf (potato bread), Cornbread, and Banana Tea Bread muffins. The Panniers loaf fell a little, and as I learned from my research, that was probably because I didn't get it directly into the oven. It still came out nice and moist, a little chewy but a great snack. The next night I made chili, so I made cornbread to go with it. This was a recipe I had never used before that called for NO FLOUR, just cornmeal. It also called for two large eggs, and soaking the cornmeal and shortening (I used left over bacon grease) in scalded milk till it cooled, so the bread came out with a different, more chewy recipe than I was familiar with. It was quite tasty and stood up well to the chili. The last one is a recipe I have made before that, instead of using baking powder, calls for soda and cream of tartar. I now understand that combination! It's one of my favorite recipes and has not failed me yet. There's very little fat, no milk, and relies on the bananas to do a lot of work. My trick is using bananas I have frozen and thawed before they go bad.

The Panniers loaf was good, but fell because (as I said) I let it sit too long before getting it into the oven. The cornbread turned out good, especially with the thick chili I made. The banana tea bread muffins turned out nearly perfect. Hubby and I have been enjoying them for breakfast!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  4:01:26 PM  Show Profile
Jennifer Pierson (MossHillFarmMomma, #6269) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Backyard Farmer Merit Badge!

“My family made the leap of faith and bought property three years ago in order to continue our journey in sustainable living. We started with chickens, raising day olds to laying hens. We love keeping chickens and enjoy the daily fresh eggs. We then raised several heritage breed turkeys for our holiday meals. We butchered, cleaned and smoked our birds. So, when I read about the requirements for this badge I knew I had to take the next step and breed our rabbits. I am researching ways to improve our feed nutrition and sustainability.

We now have baby rabbits! Six were born but one has died and another is not expected to live. I loved watching the mama rabbit prepare her nest for the babies. I have seen a demonstration of how to butcher a rabbit but I am not sure that I am ready to do this on my own. I want the ability to raise rabbits for meat but it is currently not in our diet. I will research some type of soup or stew recipe that will help 'hide" the rabbit meat.

I am starting a fodder system to sprout organic grains for a daily fresh food source for both our rabbits, chickens, and goats.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Apr 10 2015 :  4:08:43 PM  Show Profile
Gina Lloyd (SlowQueen, #6227) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Farmgirl Jubilee Merit Badge!

“A Jubilee is a 50th anniversary celebration. I have never participated in a Jubilee before and am very excited to be experiencing this in my first year as a sister!
For Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee some of the events held included a lunch and pageant. Local folks also celebrated by cooking special dishes.

My two posts with suggestions for Jubilee were posted on: 2/16/15 with a suggestion to make clothes pin dolls to go with the official clothes pin apron and on 2/17/15 to make rose scented apron sachets.

In addition to that, I made myself an official clothes pin apron!

I am thrilled with being able to participate in Jubilee and am having a blast so far. In addition to making my apron I am also planning to make a Jubilee Fairy Garden, but believe I have accomplished enough to earn the Basic Jubilee Badge so far! Yeehaw!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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