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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 14 2010 :  12:40:59 PM  Show Profile
Rejena Girton (Rejena, #2059) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level The Secret Life of Bees badge.

"9/10/10: What a COOL trailer. I am calling our local apiary club (Danville, PA) that I just learned about yesterday at PASA’s Farm Day where Dave Owens is raising European Honey Bees for natural, organic honey that his family “grows” and sells. They REALLY need the bees for their grass-farming. Insect pollinators are VERY important and WE LOVE THEM. My husband is learning as much as he can because he would like to raise several hives at our home in the next 5 years. I hated the bee coming out of the boys mouth at the beginning.

I LOVE MaryAnn Frazier. PSU ROCKS!

• Plant bee-friendly flowers in your garden.
We raise natives to our area such as beebalms, oreganos, and many flowering shrubs like lilac, butterfly bushes, and more.

• Read Sue Monk Kidd’s “Secret Life of Bees.”
I read this book with my bookclub last month. It was a great story. Tears, lots of 'em!

We are just beginning our journey on learning about bees and honey. It is so exciting to be just starting out on this!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 14 2010 :  2:02:55 PM  Show Profile
Rejena Girton (Rejena, #2059) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner, intermediate, and expert level Backyard Farmer badge.

"Beginner Level

We pasture raise a flock of 25 laying Buff Orpington hens. We have 3 roosters and have learned a lot about our coop maintenance when we were raided by a dastardly raccoon in July. We replaced the crew with a new set of day olds and have just ONE lone survivor of our original brood. We also raised a flock of ducks that we just slaughtered and 16 of them are now in the freezer.

We feed our animals with organic feed only as an additive and starter. Our animals are on pasture, so they are fed little grain, but the fields are in the process of getting certified “Organic.” Talk about FRESH! ;o)

Intermediate Level

We are raising meat goats and I have worked on several local dairy farms as a milker. I have taught my children how to milk our goats at kidding time so we can keep a supply of frozen goat milk available in our freezer in case of emergencies. The kids find this great fun and the does are patient enough at the early stage of motherhood to sit for them.

We used to own a Painted Desert Sheep as part of our herd. He was a hoot, but a real tough boy to maintain in our environment. We rescued him and then ate him. Nasty part of the reality of farm life some times. Animals are food. At Forks Farm they raise heritage breed pigs (can’t remember the name) that we purchase for our freezer.

Expert Level

I have written a letter to our local paper, the Press Enterprise, today to explain why it is so important to know where our meat comes from and it also shares the alternate sources that are right here in everyone’s back yard that are local processors, growers, and farm markets selling meat. It was fun to explore and research this info for this letter. Thanks for the idea! Great way to get some free advertisement too, I hope it’s put in!

We eat all the goat, chicken, and duck meat we raise. We also hunt for the venison that is in our freezer. We purchase meat to supplement from Forks Farm a local farmer who runs a small farm market at their home. They raise pigs, cows and chickens. It is great fun to go see what is at market every 2 weeks. A great homeschooling adventure this is! We’ve read Why Grassfed is Best by Jo Robinson as a family and that really brought it home to my son, Tim. Give him some charts and graphs and he goes “hog” wild with data. He’s now researching all the Omega 3’s and 6’s and seeing how we can make sure our animals are providing us with the best meat possible. Did I mention Tim’s a vegetarian? Go figure!

We’ve made butter, it isn’t too hard when you have a whipper on your mixer. Sydnee did it by accident the first time she was learning to make homemade whipped cream….She’s nine and walked away. It’s not our most favorite thing, but we could totally do it again by mistake. We’ve made cheese too.

I actually had my first publication of a photo (Natural Home June 2010) of a chicken I raised. It was VERY COOL and we sure do LOVE taking shots of the goats.

This was an easy one for me to earn because our farm is an integral part of our home, our lives, and our children's schooling.

We couldn't be any happier. Okay, we need a few sheep to graze those fields that the goats don't get too. A pig would be fun and even a beef cow maybe. Ok...what a dreamer!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 14 2010 :  2:16:40 PM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning a beginner level Build It Green badge.

"We have decorated our home with ways that are considered green. We've made some simple changes.

I hand sewed curtains by purchasing scrap material from thrift stores, or recycled material. I built my own herb drying rack using old barn wood, and recycled curtain hooks to hold the drying herbs and used recycled material for the hanger. I used linen dish towels for curtains in my kitchen windows, by using tension rods and ring clips. When they are taken down they will be used for towels and/or rags. We recycled all old bedding blankets into pet bedding, and cut old sheets into strips for crocheting rag rugs. I recycled jars for candle chandeliers inside and outside the home. I recently picked up free flowers a family member was getting rid of and replanted them for outside color. I have also recycled old hankies on shelves to place under items, allowing the flower patterns to decorate the room. We saved all of our old floor rugs and reused them when camping. All of my ideas were shared either on my blog or my S.C.R.A.P. blog for other farmgirls to read about. There were many other ways we decorated our home green."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 14 2010 :  2:42:12 PM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning a intermediate level Build It Green badge.

"I shared with other Farmgirls, how I have decorated our home green.

The ideas are constantly updated on my blog and S.C.R.A.P. blog, which are listed each time I post on the forums."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 14 2010 :  2:46:00 PM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning an expert level Build It Green badge.

"I dedicated 10 hours to help a local domestic violence shelter. I have also, in the past, helped nail down OSB board onto a habitat home, installed flooring, and stained doors and trim. I have used those skills many times since.

When the families leave the domestic violence shelter, they have nothing to start their home with. I crocheted a dozen dishcloths for their new homes. In regards to the "building" skills I learned, I have painted many rooms and one garage, helped build our very own home addition, installed flooring, installed doors, built a chicken coop (twice), and many other house repairs. I've gotten pretty good at using the circular saw too."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  11:37:00 AM  Show Profile
Laura Hughes (Morning, #1915) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a beginner level Get It Together badge.

"I matched my lids to the containers and decided to use the leftover container in my craft area as a catch-all for cut threads as I sew. It is nice to be organized!

It turned out great. Now, I just have to keep up with it!"

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  11:42:38 AM  Show Profile
Melissa Bailey (MissLiss, #724) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a beginner level Know Your Food badge.

"I read "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" by Barbara Kingsolver. I kept a food journal for a month to keep track of all the items we were eating. We incorporated many more fruits and veggies into our diet and eliminated hydrogentated oils and artificial sweeteners from our diet.

I LOVED the book and have already shared it with two people. I think it has to be one of my favorite books now. Fantastic. The food journal was interesting because I felt like I was eating "better" than I actually was. That was an eye opener. So after seeing that I wasn't getting as many fruits and veggies as I thought I was getting, we incorporated them more into our diet. I started putting lettuce, tomatoes and pickles on ALL of our sandwiches. I added a second veggie to our dinner plate and a smaller starch (we used to have a food rut - a protien, a veggie and a starchy pasta or bread). The hubby is having a problem letting go of some of his favorites. We still have to have the starch every night because he just loves it...and my daughter and I have given up hydrogenated oils and artificial sweeteners, but the hubby won't give up his soda and some of his snack foods that are just loaded with junk. I have been trying to make healthier versions of his snacks, but he is still resisting. Hopefully, we can lead by example and my children and I will eventually win him over."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  11:50:38 AM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a intermediate level Crochet badge.

"I crocheted a blanket using a more difficult stitch, and crocheted in the company of friends and others.

I took the blanket to appointments etc. and crocheted until it was too big to take out of the house. I started this blanket on May 25, 2010 and finished it September 12, 2010. I simply picked a stitch from an old library book, and picked out colors at the store. I have a very happy 8 year-old. She is the child to receive this one."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  12:46:56 PM  Show Profile
Scarlett Winters (#2044) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a beginner level Shopping Green badge.

"I have become the "bag lady" with all of my tote bags used for shopping.

At first I was having trouble remembering my bags. So, now I just keep them in my van all the time. That seems to work."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  1:05:19 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth (Carrie M #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a beginner level Green Energy badge.

"I discovered that my power company, National Grid, purchases electricity from the New York Power Authority. Most of this power is produced via hydro-electric methods. NYPA has plans to create several sustainable power plants over the next ten years to add to their electric production. Currently, the cost per kwh is 0.06195 cents, and my average daily usage for June was $3.87 (with the pool pump running regularly). This is more than my 2009 usage, since last year was too cool at this time to have the pool open.
What I learned about power production was surprising! I hadn't really thought about all the different ways that power/electric could be produced. Here is what I learned:
Solar power is excellent for remote areas since it does not require running poles and lines. There is no pollution, it is quiet and has excellent long term efficiency, and when properly installed, requires very little maintenance. It is a sustainable source of power. However, solar has a high cost at installation, is only generating during daytime hours during good weather (though I have a friend who says that a full moon will create electric on her solar system), and is not practical for cities where pollution and smog prevent sunlight from getting to the system.
Wind generated electricity is a renewable source, produces no by-products, and uses very little space. It creates some noise and may require more maintanance than solar. The initial cost is high but pays for itself quickly. It does create a visual impact, and has been known to injure birds, creating an environmental risk.
Geo-thermal is a very interesting way to create electricity or for household heating. I don't understand the process, but know that it is virtually maintenance free and uses little land space since the main workings are underground. It does not require transporting or create waste. The initial cost, once again, are high, but investment is quickly regained. The biggest drawback to geo-thermal systems is that they require hot spots in the earth which are not found everywhere.
Bio-mass energy was a new one for me. This is energy created from plant and animal waste. It is inexhaustible and renewable. It is helpful to the environment in that it uses up waste materials, assisting in waste management. It is cost-effective and requires no pipelines. However, there are harmful gases emitted during production, one of which is ethanol. It is costly and requires a great deal of land space for a generation plant. It also requires an immense amount of water, creating environmental issues.
Hydro-electric, the kind of power I use in my home through National Grid, is clean and without pollutants. There are no environmental side-effects, and is less expensive to install than nuclear power plants. It requires a reservoir, however, which creates a need for EPA evaluation of local habitat and flood issues.
Nuclear power creates no greenhouse gases, is more cost-effective than burning coal, and creates great amounts of energy. The downside to nuclear power generation is harmful radioactive waste, costly uranium mining, and tremendous concerns regarding accidents and terrorist activity. It only produces electricity and is not renewable.
Coal is cheap and of reliable source. It is not renewable and does have an environmental impact in the form of climate change.
Natural gas is clean and safe and puts out about half the emissions of coal. The concerns with natural gas are that it is explosive and dangerous when spilled in transport. It has caused a great deal of disturbance to our ocean habitats.
I am pleased to see a tremendous shift, locally, toward renewable power generation. From my house I can see a wind turbine behind one neighbors home, and solar panels covering the roof of another neighbor. I know of two families with geo-thermal systems to heat their homes. And I am very glad to know that my power does not come from a nuclear plant, the worst possible system in my opinion. It is encouraging to see people taking action and protecting our local environment."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  1:17:01 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth (Carrie M #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a intermediate level Green Energy badge.

"I am currently in my third year of a major energy reduction plan in my home. After reading a book called “Serve God, Save the Planet” I began a campaign to do my part on my little plot of land in Argyle, NY, in hopes that my changes would have an impact on others. I keep track of expenditures on a monthly basis, but since our lifestyle/usage changes with the season (ie, heating costs in the winter and pool pump/air conditioning in the summer with lulls in usage in spring and fall), it is easier to see my overall savings on an annual basis.
Electric: 2007—32 kwh#8203;/per day
2008—21.8 kwh/per day
2009—22 kwh/per day
2010—28 kwh/per day
(2010 usage was up because of a much longer summer and twice the pool usage over previous years. We balance this out with less traveling and vacationing.)
Fuel Oil:2006—380.6 gallons
2007—451.3 gallons
2008—281 gallons
2009—187.3 gallons
Propane:2007—107.6 gallons
2008—92 gallons
2009—78.1 gallons
2010—no deliveries yet this year
(2009 & 2010 heating costs were down due to the installation of a small wood stove to replace a propane heat stove.)
We have conscientiously reduced our usage in all areas by unplugging unnecessary appliances, using power strips for other appliances so that they may be turned off when not in use, switched to battery operated clocks, removed the TV and VCR/DVD unit, converted to energy saving lightbulbs, installed low flow shower and sink units, and cooking on the woodstove or outdoors in the fire pit. We have cut our power bill in half."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  1:35:02 PM  Show Profile
Carrie Meerwarth (Carrie M #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an expert level Green Energy badge.

"Since I have already reduced my energy usage by a tremendous amount over the last 4 years, I have spent the last three months making smaller changes. We are currently car-pooling for soccer games, which we hadn't done in the last two seasons. I installed solar lighting along the outdoor stairways and along the path to my camper. We are limiting the pool pump usage (though this has been a much longer swimming season than we have ever had) by careful timing. I've also camped in my yard all summer instead of driving to vacation spots. I charge my cell phone in my car, as opposed to charging at home, so that energy comes off my already running engine and not on my National Grid account. I've been serving more un-cooked meals such as salads and raw fruits and veggies to reduce cooking expenditures. We ran our air-conditioners as little as possible this summer and used the pool at night to cool off before bed. And, of course, everyone in my home uses the clothes line for laundry.
I have been sharing my ideas and everything that I learn about saving energy with anyone who will sit still long enough to listen. When I share that we have cut our electric bill in half, they will usually become interested. As I first make a change, big or small, it requires some effort and self-discipline, but after a short time it becomes second nature. I find myself thinking about my energy usage all the time and making conscientious decisions on a daily basis. My kids are catching on and seem to enjoy assisting me. We are all careful to turn off power strips when we are done using appliances, and the kids pay close attention to the pool pump. It has become a uniting family project!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  2:17:05 PM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a beginner level Green Energy badge.

"I researched our electric and propane costs.

I was shocked to realize that less than half of our electric bill was usage, and the remaining costs were fees etc. We took a look at the watts used on household items to see how we could reduce our costs."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  2:22:18 PM  Show Profile
Kristina Nelson (FieldsofThyme, #800) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a intermediate level Green Energy badge.

"I kept track of our expenses and costs for wood, corn for the corn burner, propane, electric, and gasoline (car, mower).

We installed energy saving light bulbs, and have removed our dishwasher that was not energy efficient. We took advantage of any good, free firewood, and shortened hot showers. We cut back on driving times and driving trips to town. we cut our electric bill, for the summer months, more than half by not running our window air conditioners, and using ceiling fans to cool the house. We also cooked over the grill or fire to reduce our cost cooking with the electric stove. We have plans to replace the stove, from electric to gas in the future."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  2:31:57 PM  Show Profile
Loyce Krogel (traildancer, #1272) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Buttoned Up badge.

"This morning I went through the tin that has all my buttons.

I removed all the buttons that were still on cards. I don't even remember what projects some of them were for! But some left-over buttons reminded me of garments I had made. I also found a sewing kit I didn't even know I had!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  2:37:56 PM  Show Profile
Loyce Krogel (traildancer, #1272) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Knitting badge.

"I have taught two left-handed people to knit by having them sit directly in front of me and copying what I do. Much easier than having them sit beside me and try to mimic only backwards!

I have been knitting for over twenty years and actually learned as a child. During this time I have knit more than 20 sweaters of varying difficulty. But I had never done a dishcloth! So I got some recycled yarn and a pattern book and jumped in. I prefer knitting items with a definite right and wrong side. I don't like garter stitch! It slows me down. I made four dishcloths over several days, so I think I met the time requirement."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  2:50:44 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Stephens (girlonaroof, #592) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Aprons badge.

"I have been wearing an apron in the kitchen for a couple years now. I finally made my own.

It turned out so well, I gave it to a friend and made myself another one!"


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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  3:12:04 PM  Show Profile
Rejena Girton (Rejena, #2059) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a beginner, intermediate, and expert level Entrepreneurial Spirit badge.

"Beginner Level
My children and I started the business: Violet Acres. We didn’t tuck it under, we took a loan, bought a troop of Boer Goats ready to kid and we are on our way. We are using their grandfather’s barn and fields and we’ve sold our first kids at auction.

Intermediate Level
The cards are made and distributed. The kids have created and started our business with the state. We have our business up on the web, www.violetacresfarm.com. It is a start, but it feels G R E A T !!!!

Expert Level
We are shouting it, selling it, and drumming up the business! So fun. What a great experience for us all!

We are hoping to start making some money next year with a good kid sale for March 2011.
That would be excellent. We are marketing and trying to figure out ways to direct market the meat to our customer base.
We've joined PASA( a local sustainable agriculture organization in PA).

We are marketing our kid run Boer Goat Farm through: (www.violetacresfarm.com)."

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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  3:33:18 PM  Show Profile
Heidi Jackson (Heidi Jackson , #1946) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a beginner level Going Green badge.

"I got rid of all the non-green cleaners in my home. I had a few stragglers hiding in the way back but I finally got them all."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 15 2010 :  3:40:23 PM  Show Profile
Heidi Jackson (Heidi Jackson , #1946) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a intermediate level Going Green badge.

"I made my own laundry soap.

Found a recipe on the boards, and went looking for Borax, which was a hard find in NYC. Had to special order at my organic "super store."

My husband and son didn't care for the lavender scent of my detergent, (in their defense it was a tad bit much) so I made a second batch with tea tree oil, and that seems to be a winner for now.

I think all and all we will probably go back to Dr. Bonner's because it's a liquid and liquid or the Biokleen I see advertised in the magazine. We live in a flat in a city and carry our laundry back and forth and powder is messy and spills easily. That said I am not throwing away my HUGE box of cleaner, so we are good for months."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 20 2010 :  2:51:58 PM  Show Profile
Scarlett Winters (#2044) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a intermediate level Shopping Green badge.

"Since developing multiple chemical sensitivities, I've had to do a lot of research on chemical-free and natural cleaning methods. I pretty much resorted to using baking soda and vinegar for most things. However, I have had a difficult time finding a safe product to use on wood (and I LOVE wood furniture). Today, I found such a product. WooHoo!

Due to my health, I've had to hire someone to clean for me. Rather than having her bring her own supplies, I asked her to use mine. I purchased natural products for her to use and taught her how to use them. It turned out beautifully. I was able to be there the whole time she was cleaning without a respirator. I hope everyone can switch to safer products soon - for all our sakes."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 20 2010 :  3:00:40 PM  Show Profile
Loyce Krogel (traildancer, #1272) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a beginner level Aprons badge.

"I sewed a half apron for a friend from a pattern. Because my serger wasn't working at the time I decided to use french seams for a finished look.

I had to rip out the first seam because I misremembered how to sew a french seam. The last time I used a french seam was making my going away dress for my wedding 25 years ago. The apron turned out lovely and my friend loves it. I also made myself one, and one for a wedding shower gift so I fulfilled the time requirement.

My friend and I wore our aprons to feed apples to the horses and also to pick blackberries to make a pie. We felt very "farmgirl-ish," especially with juice-stained hands. The pies were delicious."
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 20 2010 :  3:13:40 PM  Show Profile
Melissa Kunze (hsmommel, #1836) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a beginner level BakeOver MakeOver badge.

"I decided to try doing a bakeover from scratch using MaryJane's recipe from her Ideabook. I loved how soft the dough was...is that silly? :-D But seriously, I was impressed with how soft and light the dough came out...like a pillow.

Anyhow, I decided to try a "Leftovers" bakeover, and well, to be totally honest, it wasn't the biggest hit, but everyone ate it. The bakeover part was the best part, just my combination of leftovers probably weren't the best choices: corned beef, misc. veggies, and a very small sauce. The funny part is, with the what was left of the leftover bakeover a few nights later was added to leftover stew and "WoW", it was awesome!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 20 2010 :  3:20:04 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Stephens (girlonaroof, #592) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a beginner level Gaining Ground badge.

"When we moved to a farm 9 months ago, a compost pile is one of the first things I did. It feels great to know we are wasting less and less.

Next we will build a better structure. I've had a time keeping the chickens and our collie out of it!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12274 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12274 Posts

Posted - Sep 20 2010 :  3:25:45 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Stephens (girlonaroof, #592) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a beginner, intermediate, and expert level Get It Together badge.

"Moving facilitated the organization process for the beginner level. For the intermediate level, my mom and I worked together. My parents moved in with us about 6 weeks ago. Mom and I made our list, and gave items we had two of to a young woman who was starting housekeeping.

For the expert level, I enlisted my father. He always keeps his knives sharp. So he was a great teacher.

Now that I have sharp knives, I can't believe I was using dull knives. As for kitchen organization, it is an ongoing process. Mom and I regularly throw out unneeded items that seem to collect. This makes finding what we do use so much easier."
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